Carrollton's First Ferry

Earliest ferry service from Carrollton across the Mississippi River to the West Bank area known as Nine Mile Point was operating by 1845. Rowers powered these skiff ferries. In the mid- and late 1800s, visitors to Carrollton could disembark the New Orleans and Carrollton Railroad and then walk 2 blocks towards the ferry terminal, which was located near the present-day river end of Cambronne Street.

"Around the city are situated extensive groves of oranges. The largest are those opposite Carrollton (7th Dist.) on Nine Mile Point (Mr. Austin Rountree's and Mr. Keep's) and those below Algiers. The Rountree (selected trees) and Keep groves are easily visited by taking the street cars to Carrollton and thence cross the river by the large skiff ferry." New Orleans Guide, James Zacharie, 1893

Images

Ferry Terminal, upriver from steamboat wharf

Ferry Terminal, upriver from steamboat wharf

The skiff ferry terminal was located near the tip of the arrow in this map. First Street is now St. Charles Avenue. Originally named Nayades, the street alongside the New Orleans and Carrollton Railroad tracks changed names at Lowerline, the downriver boundary of Carrollton. View File Details Page

Carrollton Centennial History, 1945, Edgar Perilloux

Carrollton Centennial History, 1945, Edgar Perilloux

The setback of the levee in the 1890s means the exact spot would now be in the river. The batture beyond the river end of Cambronne Street comes closest to the site. View File Details Page

Ferry Franchise Sale Notice

Ferry Franchise Sale Notice

The Carrollton Sun, September 12, 1860 View File Details Page

Cite this Page:

Michael Mizell-Nelson, “Carrollton's First Ferry,” New Orleans Historical, accessed March 28, 2017, http://neworleanshistorical.org/items/show/358.
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