Woolworth's

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Woolworth's was a retail store and site of the historic sit-ins and protests for integration. In 1960, students staged the first lunch counter sit-in at Woolworth's. Students also protested and boycotted the store for two years demanding that Woolworth's hire African American workers.

Day after day, protesters faced criticism and sometimes physical violence. Protesters were even picked up by the police for their participation.

Dr. Raphael Cassimere, then a student at the University of New Orleans (then LSUNO) and the president of the local chapter of the NAACP Youth Council, states that he never expected the protests to last as long as they did, but Woolworth's and the other Canal Street stores held out until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 went into effect in 1965.

Video

Why did the boycotts last so long?
Clip of Dr. Raphael Cassimere's Oral History ~ Source: Earl K. Long Library Special Collections ~ Creator: Claire DeLucca
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Although it was called the Woolworth's boycotts, were other stores also boycotted?
Clip of Dr. Raphael Cassimere's Oral History ~ Source: Earl K. Long Library Special Collections ~ Creator: Claire DeLucca
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How were you treated during the Woolworth's boycotts?
Clip of Dr. Raphael Cassimere's Oral History ~ Source: Earl K. Long Library Special Collections ~ Creator: Claire DeLucca
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What kind of support existed for the boycotts and pickets?
Clip of Dr. Raphael Cassimere's Oral History ~ Source: Earl K. Long Library Special Collections ~ Creator: Claire DeLucca
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What advice do you have for people involved in the civil rights movement?
Clip of Dr. Raphael Cassimere's Oral History ~ Source: Earl K. Long Library Special Collections ~ Creator: Claire DeLucca
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Images

Map

South Rampart Street & Canal Street, New Orleans, LA