The Greenville encampment is important for African American military history in the U.S. In 1866, Maj. Gen. Phillip Sheridan, commander of the Department of the Gulf, was authorized to organize a regiment of African American Cavalry, designated the…

After the Confederate retreat and Admiral Farragut's capture of New Orleans and the surrounding area by May 1, 1862, federal forces continued to use the fortification and even improved it significantly. Most of the work was conducted by "contraband"…

Hamilton Square, a public space created in 1833 in what is now the Carrollton neighborhood of New Orleans, was renamed Palmer Park through a city ordinance in July 1902. The name change was spearheaded by Adam Junker, a Carrollton business and civic…

Founded in 1841, St. Augustine is the oldest African-American parish in the United States. The church was founded by free people of color, who purchased additional pews for the enslaved. Civil Rights activists Homer Plessy and A.P. Tureaud,were…

Begin this tour by climbing aboard the Elysian Fields bus, just as many black students did on their first day of classes in September 1958. The bus runs from Canal Street, through the French Quarter, and all the way up Elysian Fields Avenue to the…

On May 4, 1867, Guillaume acted. What happened next is open to some debate. According to the New Orleans Times, at 11:30 a.m. Guillaume hailed a “Whites Only” car number 148 on Love Street, now known as Rampart. When the driver refused to stop,…

Joseph Guillaume had had enough. The Civil War was over, Reconstruction was in full swing, yet still the practice of segregation on the streetcars of New Orleans continued. Every third streetcar—although it was sometimes less often—was supposed…

During the Second World War, a labor shortage developed as men began to serve in the armed forces. Women were increasingly encouraged to take over responsibilities on the home front. Women took jobs of all types: skilled and unskilled, manual and…

Shortly before the arrest of Homer Plessy in June 1892, a successful streetcar strike initiated a wave of union organizing that culminated in what has been called the first biracial general strike in US history. Between 20,000 and 25,000 union…

Pralines are thought to have originated in seventeenth-century France when the chef of César, duc de Choiseul, Comte du Plessis-Praslin coated almonds with sugar. While sugared nuts were already enjoyed throughout the world, the candy termed…

Until 1958, all park amenities, including the playground, were restricted to white residents. African American children and families were banned from entering the park. In a 1995 interview, the late author Tom Dent discusses his childhood experience…

Cross over to the path along the side of the park that is Exposition Boulevard. Walk along and admire the houses on your way to Prytania Street, the main entrance to the fair in 1884. In post-reconstruction New Orleans, the celebrated event,…

Just two days after the battle, the Daily Picayune suggested the creation of a monument, and in 1882 the city set aside land for a marker. Finally, in 1891, the monument materialized due to the efforts of a group called the Fourteenth of September…

On Canal Street, Reconstruction forces prepared to defend the state government and, most importantly, Governor Kellogg. Though the state used the St. Louis Hotel on Royal Street as its government building, Kellogg took shelter in the U.S. Custom…