Harriet Martineau, Saxe Weimar, and numerous other antebellum writers described New Orleans free women of color as promiscuous, seductive characters who sought partnerships with wealthy white men so they could live a life of leisure. Indeed, Dorothée…

Many visitors to New Orleans are familiar with the song “The House of the Rising Sun,” made popular by the English band The Animals in 1967. The song itself has roots far back in English folk balladry, long before any association with New Orleans.…

Le Petit Salon was once the most exclusive and prestigious private women’s organization in New Orleans. Founded in 1924 and described as a “circle of distinguished ladies,” the Salon quickly became an influential player in the cultural revival of the…

In March 1923, an oak tree was planted in Palmer Park to honor the death of Julia Blocker Montgomery, a nearby resident. The Daughters of the American Revolution dedicated the tree in memory of Montgomery, who often played with children in the park.…

Delia Swift, alias Bridget Fury, was a redhead who first made her debut as a prostitute at the age of twelve. Though originally from Cincinnati, where she was also a known thief, Swift moved to New Orleans in 1856, and has become one of the most…

Gwen Bristow, though not originally from New Orleans, was a great contributor to both Southern literature and the Times-Picayune newspaper. She helped mold the face of Southern writing into what it is today, influencing entire generations of New…

In 1910, a self-taught jazz pianist and vocalist - a twelve-year-old girl named Emma Barrett - began performing in venues across New Orleans [1]. Despite being unable to read music, Barrett was in high demand[1] and quickly became a fixture in the…

During the Second World War, a labor shortage developed as men began to serve in the armed forces. Women were increasingly encouraged to take over responsibilities on the home front. Women took jobs of all types: skilled and unskilled, manual and…

In 1897, Newcomb College was becoming cramped, and President Dixon found himself writing to the President of Tulane. He expressed the need for another dorm to house all the girls and accommodate the growing College. In response, the Gables was added…

Newcomb administrators and faculty members were rather unique in their ideas about the physical education of women, especially when compared to other schools at the time. Dixon hired Clara Baer to meet the challenge of winning over students and their…